examine circumstances surrounding a catastrophe in which you must communicate important information to many people as quickly as possible.

Does economic circumstance and/or culture play any role in access to information? How is information disseminated? What happens when important information must be shared, but access to that information is limited?

In this Discussion, you examine circumstances surrounding a catastrophe in which you must communicate important information to many people as quickly as possible.

To Prepare for this Discussion:

  • Consider the following scenario:

You are responsible for communicating information to a large population following a catastrophe. There has been a solar flare and some power grids have failed. How do you get information to as many people as possible, knowing that some people will have access to the Internet and some will not?

  • Consider the socioeconomic and cross-cultural differences in the population for greater access to information.
  • PLEASE REVIEW  THE READING FOR THIS WEEK AND TRY TO INCORPORATE THEM INTO ANSWER

Baron, L. F., Neils, M., & Gomez, R. (2014). Crossing new borders: computers, mobile phones, transportation, and English language among Hispanic day laborers in Seattle, Washington. Journal of the Association for Information Science & Technology, 65(1), 98–108. DOI: 10.1002/asi.22949
Note: You will access this article from the Walden Library databases.

Cook, J. E., & Attari, S. Z. (2012). Paying for what was free: Lessons from the New York Times paywall. Cyberpsychology, Behavior & Social Networking, 15(12), 682–687. DOI: 10.1089/cyber.2012/0251
Note: You will access this article from the Walden Library databases.

Dixon, L. J., Correa, T., Straubhaar, J., Covarrubias, L., Graber, D., Spence, J., & Rojas, V. (2014). Gendered space: The digital divide between male and female users in Internet public access sites. Journal of Computer-Mediated Communication, 19(4), 991–1009. DOI: 10.1111/jcc4.12088
Note: You will access this article from the Walden Library databases.

Eastin, M. S., Cicchirillo, V., & Mabry, A. (2015). Extending the digital divide conversation: Examining the knowledge gap through media expectancies. Journal of Broadcasting & Electronic Media, 59(3), 416–437. DOI: 10.1080/08838151.2015.1054994
Note: You will access this article from the Walden Library databases.

Peral-Peral, B., Arenas-Gaitán, J., & Villarejo-Ramos, Á. (2015). From digital divide to psycho-digital divide: Elders and online social networks. Comunicar, 23(45), 57–64.
Note: You will access this article from the Walden Library databases.

Newitz, A. (2015). Email is the new generation gap. Gizmodo. Retrieved from http://gizmodo.com/email-is-the-new-generation-gap-1743697716

Reality Mine (2015). How mobile device use varies across generations. Reality Mine. Retrieved from http://www.realitymine.com/mobile-device-use/

Optional Resources

Ólafsson, K., Livingstone, S., & Haddon, L. (2014). Children’s use of online technologies in Europe: A review of the European evidence base (Revised edition). LSE, London: EU Kids Online. Retrieved from http://www.lse.ac.uk/media@lse/research/EUKidsOnline/EU%20Kids%20III/Reports/D2.2RevisedEvidenceReview_sept2014.pdf

Skaletsky, M., Soremekun, O., & Galliers, R. D. (2014). The changing – and unchanging – face of the digital divide: An application of Kohonen self-organizing maps. Information Technology for Development, 20(3), 218–250.

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